Dental Tips and Guide for Relocation

Posted on May 4, 2009 in Dental Articles

PictureThere are so many things to think about for moving house! Moving is always hard, whether it is relocating for a job or simply finding a new place called home. We have put together some helpful tips and guides to hopefully ease the pains of moving. One of the things that you need to remember when you are moving is to start retrieving your dental records at least 7-8 weeks in advance.

General information that you may require from your dentist are:

  • Treatment summary of your (or your family member’s) current or last treatment. This might be required by your future dentist for reference. Make sure that your treatment summary is signed by your dentist.
  • Radiographs – be it OPG X-ray, lateral x-ray, periapical x-ray or other radiographics that you have taken in the last 12 months.
  • If you are doing orthodontic (braces) treatment, you may also need to get the latest model of your teeth.

Referrals for dentists or specialists in the country that you are moving to.

 
PictureBut there are treatments that need to be completed as soon possible before you move to another place. You would not want to move without completing these treatments for your pearly whites:
 
Root Canal Treatment – it usually require 2 to 3 visits over a 2-3 weeks period. We do suggest that you complete the entire root canal treatment and crowning before you leave, or start the treatment only after you have settled into your new home. Alternatively, you can choose to complete the root canal treatment first and start the permanent tooth crown with your new dentist. Do not worry that you will have a missing tooth during your move, as your dentist will issue a temporary crown for you – which is, however, not most comfortable.
 
 Orthodontic Treatment – this is a long treatment and usually takes about 2-3 years. The fortunate thing is that orthodontic specialists or orthodontists around the world are well-trained to continue treatment for their orthodontic clients who visit them midway through the treatment. Orthodontic treatment require regular cleaning and adjustment – so ensure that you keep the dentist visits no further than 2 months apart. The last thing you want is cavities developing or teeth gaps re appearing when you are settled in your new place. Do request for referrals well in advance, either from your current dentist or friends in your new place. You may need to arrange for a consultation with your new dentist as soon as possible so that he/she can assess the status of your treatment prior to starting the treatment. It is also a good chance for you to assess your dentist!
 
Dental Implant – you would get the optimal aesthetics if you start and complete the entire course of your treatment with the same dentist. Such procedures, depending on complexity, can span from 2 months to 1 year or more. If you really need to move without completing the treament, ensure that you have a complete set of your dental and treatment records.Finding a new dentist is something to take seriously and it also completely acceptable to change dentists if you are not happy with your current one. Choosing a dentist that is right for you and your family is an important decision that may take a bit of time and research on your part. Knowing what factors to consider when searching for the ideal dental office is often confusing and overwhelming, ultimately ending with you merely picking a name out of the phone book.Be sure to make a list of questions to ask your potential new dentist. Some important factors to consider when looking for a new dentists might be: 
  • Picturethe location of the dental office – near your workplace or home?
  • availability of appointment times and office hours
  • after hours emergency care 
  • the training of the dentist

Of course, these are just a few factors to consider. Take your time and write down what is most important to you. You also might have to visit several dentist before you find one that you are comfortable with just like your previous dentist, but there is nothing wrong with that.